CURRENT FAVORITES

  Forbidden Planet

  Giant Monsters All-Out Attack

  Godzilla

  Gojira

  Green Slime

  It! The Terror From Beyond Space

  The Abominable Dr. Phibes

  The Crawling Eye

  The Mask of Fu Manchu

  The Thing

  Them!

  War of the Gargantuas

PRE-ATOMIC AGE

  Dracula

  Frankenstein (1931)

  Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

  Son of Frankenstein (1939)

  Ghost of Frankenstein (1942)

  Frankenstein Vs. The Wolf Man
  (1943)

  House of Frankenstein (1944)

  King Kong

  Son of Kong

  Metropolis

  The Mummy (1932)

  The Mummy's Hand (1940)

  The Mummy's Tomb (1942)

  The Mummy's Ghost (1944)

  The Mummy's Curse (1944)

  The Werewolf of London

  The Wolf Man

ATOMIC AGE

  Atomic Submarine

  It! The Terror From Beyond Space

  The Creature from the Black Lagoon

  Forbidden Planet

  The Deadly Mantis

  Kronos

  The Giant Claw

  The Giant from the Unknown

  The Thing From Another World

JAPAN

  Battle in Outer Space

  Gamera

  Godzilla

  Godzilla Raids Again

  Godzilla Vs. MechaGodzilla

  Giant Monsters All-Out Attack

  Gojira

  Green Slime

  Half Human

  Mothra

  Rodan

  Varan

GREAT BRITAIN

  Crack in the World

  Quatermass and The Pit

  Quatermass 2

  Spaceways

 The Abominable Snowman

  The Crawling Eye

  The Giant Behemoth

  X the Unknown

WEIRD AND UNIQUE FILMS

  The Adventures of
  Baron Munchausen

  The Abominable Dr. Phibes

  The Assassination Bureau

  The Big Lebowski

  The Phantom of the Paradise

  The Return of the Witch

  The Rocky Horror Picture Show

  The Saragossa Manuscript

  Theatre of Blood

  The Wicker Man

MODERN SCI FI FILMS

  2001

  Alien

  Aliens

  Count Dracula (1970)

  Dark Star

  The Mummy (Brendan Fraser)

  Silent Running

  Star Wars (1977)

  The Omega Man

  The Thing From Another World
  (Kurt Russell)

NON SCI FI FILMS

  Bad Boys

  Death Hunt

  Seven Samurai

  The Sin of Harold Diddlebock

  The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

FILMS I DON'T CARE FOR

  Event Horizon

  The Matrix

 

 

 

Godzilla

THE GREATEST MONSTER MOVIE EVER MADE. What evil genius thought to splice a Japanese monster movie together with US-shot Raymond Burr footage to create the PERFECT monster movie?! The differences in production values between the original and the manufactured scenes is fascinating. The glimpse into fragments of Japanese culture is also fascinating and was a unique and driving experience when I was a kid fascinated by this movie. Godzilla is so much more than a guy in a Godzilla suit stomping a model of Tokyo flat -- someone left the door open and glimpses of a tantalizing alien culture far more sophisticated and civilized than our own were allowed to be seen by the second-third waves of Baby Boomer kids. The awesome score drives this one over the top, over the MOON. Godzilla isn't just a bull's-eye, it's the arrow the mythical archer split the tree with. Cheap special effects abound.

The acting in the Japanese version is very good and emotionally moving, the US-produced acting, aside from Raymond Burr is directly from Central Casting. The monster itself, Godzilla, Gojira, is of mythical proportions. A huge monster awakened by atomic detonations from its sixty-million-year-long sleep destroys all it sees. It's unimportant why. Destruction is absolute. "And all man's genius seemed pale and weak" is a great line from a similar Japanese monster movie -- the humbling experience that a giant monster is eating our lunch and that we are powerless. In the 1950s! The height (up until 2005) of military-worship! Science fiction is a liberating vehicle as far as being able to present a possible world, possible worlds, which would otherwise mightily piss off the status quo, get you burned at the stake. And so Godzilla allows the notion that other realities could be just as real as what you're doing right now. Maybe there is something else out there. It's entertaining, it's enlightening, it's empowering. And Godzilla tragically dies with Dr. Serizawa and the secret of his Oxygen Destroyer at the end of the movie, "Live happily with Emiko." OH MY GOD. How Japanese can you get? BRILLIANT STUFF.

I have honestly lost track of how many times I've watched Godzilla. It was the first videotape I bought when I first bought a VCR ($80 for a tape?!). Since then I've found the original Japanese version (it would make a great B side to a future edition of this DVD). I still love this movie. I know it through and through. It's fascinating in its original Japanese version, but somehow, accidentally, the US-spliced version transcends itself and gracefully rises to an iconic height -- this is a fun movie to watch, but it's also the true high-water mark for the entire genre of giant monster movies, effortlessly surpassing *everything* produced before or since. The schlocky US-produced bits mingle with the very well produced Japanese original, held together with Raymond Burr -- when a "real" actor takes a science fiction role seriously it makes an enormous difference -- think of Forbidden Planet and the original The Thing From Another World -- while Godzilla doesn't have the budget of either of those movies, Raymond Burr's acting carries the day. The result is a brilliant, never-to-be-repeated amalgam of pieces which somehow tell a taut, compelling story that will delight every little boy who likes monster movies. Godzilla is truly the greatest monster movie ever made. Godzilla is one of the best movies ever made, it may not be The Rules of the Game but it's a lot of fun, and fun ought to count for more than it ordinarily does when it comes to ranking movies.

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